What should I expect?

Expect to enjoy yourself! The Mid-Texas Symphony likes to take the “phony” out. Everyone is welcome and sure to have an awesome experience. This is the time to let go of any preconceptions you may have about classical music or the concert experience. If you feel a little nervous, that’s OK. Some things about the concert may seem strange because they’re new to you, but if you just focus on the music, you’ll have a great time.  Open yourself up to the music. Let it trigger your emotions—maybe even your memories. Feel the rhythms; follow the tunes. Watch the musicians and the conductor, and see how they interact with each other. Notice how the music ebbs and flows—surging and powerful at some times, delicate and ephemeral at others, and everything in between.

Can I bring my kids?

It depends on the concert and on the age of your kids. Many standard-length classical concerts are inappropriate for small children because they require an attention span that is difficult for youngsters to maintain. If you do plan to take your children to the concert, these tips might help you to create the best musical experience for your kids:

  • Young children are especially intrigued by the many different instruments of the orchestra and the way they are played. Try to sit up close to the orchestra, so your kids will have a great view of everything that’s going on.

  • To further build your children’s interest in classical music, play classical radio or CDs around the house. When they are old enough to sit quietly for an extended period, you may wish to bring them to the first half of a standard concert. An interested preteen or teenager could also have a marvelous time at an orchestra concert, particularly if it features several different pieces.

  • In all cases, it’s a good idea to check with the orchestra directly about the appropriateness of the concert you plan to attend with your kids.

What should I wear?

Most people will be wearing business-type clothes or slightly dressy casual clothes, but you’ll see everything from jeans to “dressy church clothes.”  Some people enjoy dressing up and making it a very special afternoon and you can, too. Because our classical concerts are in the afternoon you will not see evening gowns and tuxedos unless you are coming to a fancy gala and then the dress code will be indicated.  Please go easy on the perfume and cologne, which can distract others near you and even prompt them to sneeze (which may distract you)!

Should I arrive early?

Absolutely! If you purchased a Season No. 39 subscription package come at 2:35 for seating at 2:50pm and enjoy the pre-concert talk; an intimate and exciting look at the composer, the music or the history of the piece presented by a MTS musician.

IF you are not a subscriber plan to arrive 20 minutes before concert time, so you can find your seat, turn off your cell phone, take a look at your surroundings, absorb the atmosphere, and have time to glance through the program book, too.  Take a selfie in front of our step and shoot and post it to your Facebook page to let your friends know you’re at a symphony concert. You won’t be alone; most concertgoers make a point of coming early to read the program notes
Rushing to your seat at the last minute doesn’t really give you enough time to get settled, so you may not fully enjoy the first piece on the program. And there’s another good reason to come early: Most concerts start on time. If you’re late, you may end up listening from the lobby! If that happens, the usher will allow you inside during a suitable pause in the program, so your arrival won’t disturb other concertgoers.

What should I do with my cell phone during the concert?

Before the concert begins, please turn all electronic devices (cell phones, pagers, alarm watches, etc.) off or set them to vibrate. It’s a good idea to double-check in the few minutes before the concert begins, and again as intermission draws to a close. The concert hall is a very acoustically sensitive place; even the smallest noises carry throughout the hall–especially during the quiet sections of a performance from any given seat in the “house.” We also broadcast live symphony performances on the Texas Public Radio station, KPAC,  and keep archived recordings of our concerts; active cell phones/pagers tend to interfere with the quality of the hall’s recording/transmitting devices.

How long will the concert last?

It varies, but most orchestra concerts are about 90 minutes to two hours long, with an intermission at the halfway point. Very often there will be several pieces on the concert; but sometimes there is one single work played straight through. It’s a good idea to take a look at the program before the concert to get an idea of what to expect.

Can I take pictures?

Cameras, video recorders, and tape recorders are not permitted in the concert hall. If you have a camera and want a souvenir of a special evening at the symphony, it can be fun to ask someone to take your picture outside the concert hall before you go in.  Often, the guest artist(s) of the evening will be available in the lobby after the concert to sign autographs and (occasionally) for pictures.

What if I don’t know anything about classical music? Do I need to study beforehand?

There’s no need to study; the music will speak for itself. Just come and enjoy!  If you’d like to know more about the music read the program notes – right here on our webpage.  Over time, many frequent concertgoers do find their enjoyment is deeper if they prepare for a concert. This can be simple, like reading the program notes beforehand; or it can be more involved, like listening to recordings of the music to be performed in the days before they attend a concert.  You know yourself best, so if research interests you, go ahead and follow your curiosity.

When should I clap?

  • At the beginning of the concert, the concertmaster will come onstage. The audience claps as a welcome, and as a sign of appreciation to all the musicians.

  • After the orchestra tunes, the conductor (and possibly a soloist) will come onstage. Everyone claps to welcome them, too. This is also a good moment to make sure your program is open, so you can see the names of the pieces that will be played and their order. Note In most classical concerts—unlike jazz or pop—the audience never applauds during the music. They wait until the end of each piece, then let loose with their applause. But this can be a little tricky, because many pieces seem to end several times—in other words, they have several parts, or “movements.” These are listed in your program.
    In general, musicians and your fellow listeners prefer not to hear applause during the pauses between these movements, so they can concentrate on the progress from one movement to the next. Symphonies and concertos have a momentum that builds from the beginning to the end, through all their movements, and applause can “break the mood,” especially when a movement ends quietly. Sometimes, though, the audience just can’t restrain itself, and you’ll hear a smattering of applause—or a lot of it—during the pause before the next movement.

What if I am not sure whether the piece is truly over? 

  • One clue is to watch the conductor. Usually, s/he won’t relax between movements, but keep hands raised; the attention of the musicians will remain on the conductor. When in doubt, wait and follow what the rest of the audience does!

  • At the end of the piece, it’s time to let the musicians know how you felt about their playing. Many pieces end “big”—and you won’t have any doubt of what to do then! Some end very quietly, and then you’ll see the conductor keep hands raised for a few seconds at the end, to “hold the mood.” Then the conductor’s hands will drop, someone will clap or say “Bravo!”—and that’s your cue.

What if I need to cough during the music?

Everyone gets the urge to cough now and then. Worrying about disturbing your fellow listeners is a laudable impulse, but don’t let it ruin your enjoyment of the concert. There’s a funny thing about coughing—the less worried you are about it, the less likely you are to feel the urge! So chances are you’ll feel less need to cough if you’re prepared:

  • Be sure to visit the water fountain in the lobby before the concert, and at intermission.

  • If you have a cold, take some cough medicine in advance and bring wax paper-wrapped—or unwrapped—lozenges with you. Have a few out and ready when the music begins.

  • Allow yourself to become involved in listening to the music and in watching the performers. The more you are absorbed in what’s going on, the less likely you are to cough.

  • If you absolutely can’t restrain yourself, try to wait for the end of a movement. If you feel a coughing fit coming on, it’s perfectly acceptable to quietly exit the concert hall. Don’t be embarrassed—your fellow listeners will probably appreciate your concern for their listening experience.

**Content from this page has been generously borrowed from the Corpus Christi Symphony website.  Our thanks for such excellent and succinct advice for our newest concert goers.